Russians cover their movements using civilian transport at Kakhovka Hydroelectric Power Plant

2 days ago 5

VALENTYNA ROMANENKO – SATURDAY, 6 AUGUST 2022, 19:15

In Kherson Oblast, the occupiers are covering up the movement of their equipment through the Kakhovka HPP [Hydroelectric Power Plant] dam to avoid shelling by Ukrainian Armed Forces using local residents’ civilian transport.

Source: Yurii Sobolevskyi, First Deputy Chairman of the Kherson Oblast Council, on the air of the national 24/7 joint newscast on 6 August 

Details: Sobolevsky was asked how the Russian military was replenishing its supplies after the pinpoint destruction of the occupiers’ logistics route  – the Antonivka Road Bridge.

Quote from Sobolevskyi: "They (the occupiers) use a pontoon crossing (across the Dnipro), but it doesn't really work as well as the Antonivka Road Bridge.

The bridge at Kakhovka on the dam is primarily used: there is movement of military equipment and trucks there.

But they mix their military convoys with local ones, with civilian vehicles, and our Armed Forces cannot work on such targets, because of course there would be a large number of casualties among the local residents."

We have launched English Twitter! Follow us!

Why this is important: There are three crossings in Kherson Oblast that connect the left and right banks of the Dnipro. These are the Antonivka Road Bridge near Kherson, the Antonivka railway bridge and the Kakhovka reservoir dam in Nova Kakhovka.

The Russians most often used the Antonivka Road Bridge to transfer their troops and equipment, as it is closest to Kherson. But after successful precision strikes on the bridge by the Ukrainian Armed Forces, it became impassable for movement.

The occupiers are now forced to make a considerable detour through Nova Kakhovka in order to transfer their forces to the right bank of the Dnipro and replenish their supplies.

At this time, the Armed Forces of Ukraine continue to destroy Russian warehouses and liberate settlements in Kherson Oblast.

Read Entire Article